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Posts from the ‘Painting’ category

The 25th Frome Valley Art Show Featured

It has been a busy month for me to date, leading up to my art group’s 25th Annual Art Exhibition. I was delighted when the committee asked if they could use one of my paintings (“Sunflowers”) on the advertisement poster, placed in local newsletters, on many sites and pages on the internet, and in local shops and libraries.

For me this year, the hardest part was in deciding …Read On

(NB: The painting of the rose above my head is by another artist.)

Exhibition Nerves Featured

No thanks to the world issues of Covid, my local art group had to cancel last year’s annual art exhibition. Although some restrictions are still in place here in the UK, the group is busy making preparations for this year’s, scheduled for next weekend 10th and 11th July. Sadly because of current restrictions we are unable to offer refreshments during the weekend which is a great pity as we enjoy making homemade cakes, biscuits and treats to eat with tea or coffee for sale and all profits from this part of the exhibition goes to our chosen charity (see below).

The SAA Frome Valley Art group currently has 47 members, an eclectic mix of age, mediums and styles, from acrylics (my medium of choice), pastels, watercolours, oils, gouche, ink and pen and everything in between. And, like me, most of us have found the past 16-18 months difficult to become motivated to paint, so for me it was hard determining what, if any, artwork to exhibit. But the choice has been made, and I am currently busy framing and labelling my five pieces of art. Sorry, let’s rephrase that: I am exhibiting five paintings, three framed and two on stretched box canvas including the one in the poster below.

This is our 25th annual exhibition and to celebrate, the committee asked for all frames to be either silver or white coloured. Believe me, finding good quality picture frames in silver is no easy matter and I am relieved I only needed three.

I was delighted when the committee also asked to use my painting of “Sunflowers” on the exhibition poster. I hope it entices people to come along as see what the group has been up to. the majority of the work exhibited will be for sale, with a percentage of each sale and all of the monies raised in the raffle going to this year’s good cause: The Southmead Hospital Covid-19 Charity.

With only a week to go, nerves are setting in. Will further restrictions halt the exhibition in its tracks? Will any members of the public come? Will anyone like my work? Will anyone hate what I’ve done? Will I be lucky and sell anything? Will we raise any money for the charity? What do I wear to the preview evening? What do I wear for my 2-hour tour of duty on Saturday? Can I cope with wearing a mask for 2 hours? Why am I even doing this?

I know why. I love it. I love painting. I enjoy the company of other like-minded artists. And most of all, I love seeing and hearing the reaction of others. Like books and films, not everyone is going to like the same thing. What appeals to one, will not to another, but it doesn’t not matter. It’s the being part of this wonderful group and for the support, encouragement, help and boost that matters most.

I hope some of you are able to find the time next week to pop in, have a look and enjoy the beautiful work by everyone on show and contribute a little something to the cause.

Meanwhile, stay safe, stay healthy and most of all, have some fun!

A Long Awaited Return Featured

After a much long-awaited time, the art club I attend (the SAA Frome Valley Art Group) finally re-opened its doors last Friday afternoon and evening. As a matter of safety, COVID rules where adhered to and we were assigned “bubbles” to work in. We are only a small group of 12, compared with our fellow members who meet Friday afternoons (30), so we were able to spread ourselves out around what is a large hall, with a work-table each. Plenty of room to spread our equipment out.

It felt strange and a little surreal arriving at the venue, masks on as we registered and elected a table, fetched our own chair and unpacked. But as everyone arrived and masks were removed, it didn’t take long before we settled, reacquainted ourselves and chatted about what we had or hadn’t painted during the long absence. When everyone said they had, like me, not painted a great deal during lockdown, often not having the inclination, I felt relieved I wasn’t the only person who hadn’t done much. Okay, I have painted what: six? maybe seven? paintings in the previous 14 months. That is not a lot for me, I am normally prolific; a painting a week, if not each month in normal times.

Until all restrictions are lifted, the kitchen is out of bounds which meant we could not stop for refreshments and a natter around the coffee table. Nor were we able to obtain water for paints and washing brushes so had to bring our own. Being an acrylic artist, this caused a dilemma for me as I could not leave my brushes unwashed until I returned back home. The paint on them would have dried by then and virtually impossible to remove; brushes would be ruined. Having a selection of watercolour pencils which I have not used and water-brushes (the water is contained in the brush itself, a little like a fountain pen), I thought this would be the perfect opportunity to practice with them.

Now, I’d be the first to admit I am not very good at drawing and sketching, something that is necessary for watercolour painting, and the image I chose from a photo of wallflowers picked the day before from my garden was, with hindsight, a little too ambitious even for me.  I was also pleased I used my “practice” sketchbook and not wasted expensive watercolour paper in learning how to paint with watercolour pencils. Plus the paper in the sketchbook is very smooth and didn’t take the pencil well. Still, all good practice, as they say. Here’s what I produced in the allotted time.

As it will be a few more weeks yet before we have full use of the venue and access to water etc, I shall continue with the pencils, but next week, start with a lot simpler image and on the correct paper for the medium. You know me, I love a challenge.

Painting A Jaguar Featured

After successfully completing a recent commission of a pet dog, I wanted I’d try my hand at painting another animal. This time a big cat. As I love painting against a black background, I thought the colours of this beautiful creature would stand out rather than lost in a background of jungle scenery. Slow steps over many days were needed to create the final painting, which I outline here. I hope you find the process interesting.

First, having drawn an outline of the pose I wanted on 33×24 cm heavyweight canvas linen texture paper (I use Canson brand), the background was painting in using black gesso and a 1 inch flat brush, painting in outward strokes from the outline to the edges. I then drew in outline of the eyes, nose and mouth. When drawing, I always use pastel pencils as these can be easy corrected and wiped away with a damp sponge and do not show through transparent paint.

The eyes were painting in using lemon yellow, paynes grey and titanium white, checking frequently I had them in the correct position, followed by the nose and mouth. Using a mixture of burnt sienna, lemon yellow, yellow oche, and titanium white I under-painted the complete animal. Already his character was starting to appear on the canvas.

Using the same colours the fur was slowly added along with the markings to include the shadows, hind quarters and the start of the face markings. A small amount of light green was added to the eyes. Both eyes were painted over with a clear glaze. A small amount of dark purple mixed with white was used to paint the nose.

The fur and patterns were slowly built up in layers until I was happy with the overall result.

Further depth and highlights were added as were the markings below his mouth.

Finally, and carefully, whiskers were added to complete the painting.

The Sunflower Project Featured

The Sunflower Covid Art Project in association with the SAA

Image may contain: flower, plant and nature

A few days ago I was more than honoured to be approached by the Society for All Artists (The SAA) for permission to use my “Sunflowers” painting as part of the social media promotion for a new fundraising project the Society has been working on in collaboration across the art industry with artists, art suppliers and others to announce “The Sunflower Project”. The sunflower is a symbol of hope and healing, so of course I said yes. There was no hesitation.

These past 6 months have been a terrible time worldwide thanks to the Coronavirus Pandemic, and many of us have lost someone to this dreadful illness. A close family member, a relative, a friend or colleague, and as a consequence of lockdown, the virus has affected how we have been able to mourn their passing at such a sad and difficult time. We’ve been unable to seek support and comfort from our families and friends. No shoulder to weep on, no comforting hand to hold or hug from those we hold dear and so often the case, unable to attend the funeral of one so cherished, whether their passing was from the illness or other causes. Such lonely and strange times.

For those in lockdown, art has proved a comfort. Many people and children taking up the hobby for the first time. My painting has certainly helped keep me going, although my “Sunflowers” was painted a couple of summer’s ago, inspired by those growing in my garden that year.

About the Project

With this in mind, the aim of the Sunflower Project is to encourage people – artists and non-artists alike – to draw or paint a sunflower in memoriam of friends and family lost during this terrible time, in order to create a lasting memorial website which will enable people the opportunity to upload their artwork, creating a gallery of creations to share with the world, and ensure that every life lost during the crisis was remembered and treasured. To build and maintain such a dedicated website is expensive, thus the society is looking to raise £20,000 from the public in order to facilitate what will be a spectacular permanent memorial to our loved ones.

The website will be launched in late August, and free of charge to use. In addition to the artwork gallery, the site will include signposting, advice and support for bereavement and mental health. In addition, it is hoped the project will be used to actively fundraise for the much-needed support of those with mental health difficulties.

To see more information and to donate, please visit here: https://www.gofundme.com/f/Co-vid-Art-project-sunflower

Please donate a little something if you are able and help create a permanent art memorial to those who have lost their lives to Covid-19. Or even better, paint a sunflower and submit to the gallery on the SAA website.

“Sunflowers”

“Sunflowers” is for sale at £100.00 (UK only). Should you wish to purchase it, I am donating the full amount to the Sunflower Project, so you will be helping this exciting and lasting cause. Contact me via the comments box to this post or direct on my email kitdominoart@gmail.com.

Painted in acrylics on stretched canvas, it measures 50×36 cm (18″x14″) and will be supplied ready to hang.

Prints and notebooks, and other items will be available soon.

And a big THANK YOU.

Sold at Auction Featured

Gorse Covert Bluebells

Back last autumn, a local junior & infant school asked if local businesses would consider donating a “prize” for auctioning at their annual fundraising ball scheduled for January 2020. I offered one of my paintings, especially as it was pertinent to the local area, being a framed scene of our local bluebell wood, a few yards from my home.

Once part of a large woodland, this small copse, known as Gorse Covert, sits on the edge of a local open area and park. The covert is maintained by local residents and boasts a small pond with fish, frogs and newts, plenty of birdlife including woodpeckers and owls, and populated by foxes and grey squirrels. When the native natural bluebells are in bloom, the covert is a delight to walk through, for the flowers and the gentle perfume wafting in the air. As many of you know, I love bluebells, so I have plenty of inspiration right on my doorstep.

The school was delighted to accept my donation of “Gorse Covert Bluebells”, which sold at the auction, exceeding the reserved price and helping to raise a considerable sum for their coffers and making me one happy artist.

The Angst and Agony of a First-Time Tutor Featured

What a busy month January turned out for me. If someone had told me a little over 12 years ago when I began painting that I would find myself being an art tutor, I would never have believed them. Likewise, when I accepted the opportunity to teach acrylic painting to a group in my art club, I never expected how much of my time it would take. Who would have thought teaching for 2 hours every Friday afternoon for 4 weeks would take over my life entirely. I had no idea of the abilities of those attending, and without this information, I had to structure the sessions to fit all comers.  I found out at the first session at least six had never painted before. Others were already members of the art group…. read more  

The SAA 2018 Poppy Challenge Featured

This year, being the 100th Anniversary of World War One, the SAA decided to mark the occasion by holding a Paint a Poppy Challenge. Partnered with the Royal British Legion, it is a way to say “thank you” to those courageous men and women who served and sacrificed for our country and freedom. The idea is to gather as many poppy paintings and drawings as possible together to create a unique art exhibition to be held later this year at their headquarters in Nottingham, as well as raising funds for the work the Royal British Legion does, by monetary donations from those taking part in the challenge.

The challenge was open to everyone, in any medium on any paper as long as it measured exactly 125x125mm (4.9×4.9 inches). As well as individuals, SAA art groups were able to send in group entries. Being a member of SAA Frome Valley Art, based in Winterbourne, South Gloucestershire, I decided to take part. I love a challenge, and this was undoubtedly one.

As much as I enjoy painting detail, producing a small painting is a lot harder than one imagines. First, was deciding precisely the image I wanted to create. I wanted something different from the usual poppy flower scene, one that not only reflected the simple beauty of the flower, but also the immense emotion evoked by this memorial event.  I’ve painted several poppy pictures in the past and wanted something different, one that had meaning. I thought long and hard, and unusually for me, painted many draft pictures until finally deciding on the one that for me, worked.

First,  a black background – to represent death and mourning as per the black-bordered telegrams families of those fallen often received. Also, using a black background accentuates the flower’s vibrancy, popping it out of the image. It called for a poppy in bud to represent the young age many of our soldiers were when called up to arms during conflict, some as young as sixteen.

I wanted a poppy in full flower, representing parents and families of those left behind, and I wanted falling petals, to represent those fallen in battle, a reflection too of the millions of petals dropped in various war memorial services, in mind particularly those dropped at the Remembrance service at  Royal Albert Hall, London.

Lastly, and for me the most important part, I wanted to add falling teardrops from the adult flower: tears for a son, husband, brother, uncle, grandfather who never came home.

After many weeks, my challenge attempt resulted in “Tears for the Fallen”.

“Tears for the Fallen”

It’s doubtful I will be able to get to the exhibition although it will be available online at a later date (I’ll keep you advised).

In Nover 2018, I was delighted and honoured to have this painting and its story featured on “Yesterday Uncovered” blogspot. Thank  you, Pauline Barclay.

 

Morning Mist Through Burnham Beeches Featured

During the past couple of years I’ve taken to entering art competitions, both small, online and national. Needless to say, I’ve got nowhere so far. This can, at times, be soul destroying and disheartening, especially when you see the type of work that has won or achieved a placing or merited recognition. I sometimes feel if I paint something “crap” it might get somewhere instead of the “chocolate box” images I prefer to paint but that would be doing myself a disservice. I’ve learned art is a lot like writing, both the artist and the author has to be thick-skinned. Some people love your work, others don’t. That’s life, and thank goodness we don’t all have the same tastes.

Not to be a person who gives up, I recently took part in an art challenge, organised by an international art group I am a member of. The subject matter was an autumnal forest scene for us to interpret in our own style and medium.

And… my painting was given … First Place. Wow! Now that really boosted the spirit.

Hope you like it as much as those who voted for it.

Pictures at an Exhibition Featured

The past year has gone by in a flash; I can’t believe it is twelve months since I took a giant leap and joined Frome Valley Art, affiliated to the Society for All Artists, of which I have been a member for some years.

I was nervous of joining, worried my work wasn’t up to the group’s high standard. For months I felt very much the new girl in school. It was only during the last two months I finally felt at ease, and often called upon for advice and help to my fellow painters. The group is friendly, always helping each other, and we have a lot of fun and laughs. There is no a formal tutor, we paint our own thing in our own style, in any medium we wish. Occasionally we have workshops or demonstrations, either given by one of our more experienced members or by invitation to well-known professional artists, this year’s included Keith Hornblower and Arnold Lowry.

Those past few months have also included the lead up to the group’s 23rd Annual Art Exhibition. There were many decisions to make, such as what pieces to show bearing in mind only five could be submitted. Could I get this current one finished in time? Would I be able to find the right frame or correct mount for it? What price do I put on each? Will I be disappointed if nothing sells? With nearly 200 framed exhibits along with almost 100 unframed but mounted artwork submitted, and with such an amazing about of talent producing excellent of work, the likelihood of returning home with the same number of pieces as delivered before the show, was high.

The Exhibition took place over the weekend of 12th and 13th May 2018, this being my first public exhibition. Having only had one small private exhibition before, I did not know what to expect. Finally it was time to deliver the paintings, where the stewards checked they were suitable for hanging, matched the details previously submitted, the correct catalogue number stuck on and duly hung with their corresponding labels: title, artist, medium, price. Not all were for sale, there were many green dots about.

Prior to exhibition opening was a Preview Evening where fellow members and guests could come and see the works as we enjoyed a glass of wine or two while we looked, admired and commented and mingled between the many boards filling the venue. And a most enjoyable evening it was too. It was also an opportunity to meet other members of the group we rarely see. A chance to put faces to names. Frome Valley Art runs an afternoon and evening session every Friday, it is only at demonstrations we get together, when there is little time for socialising and, even then, not everyone is able to come. It was also fun watching everyone’s reaction to the various pieces on show. Wondering what people were saying as they stood in front of mine. Were they discussing them? Did they admire them? Dislike them?

So, preview evening over. Followed by two days of nail biting. Two days of wondering… before it was time to collect our paintings after the exhibition had closed.

I went to my board – saw an empty space, a lonely label. Had one of the stewards already begun taking down my pictures?  Then it dawned on me: one of my works had sold – elation! It was one I had decided to show at the last minute. It was also the one I least expected to sell.


“Buttermere” SOLD

And I am no longer a public exhibition virgin. That must count for something!

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